Viewing entries tagged
Redding

Church of Dirt

Church of Dirt

I know there is a ton to recover from, but the faster and harder we hit this erosion management the far better our communities years of trail building investment will be protected.

Questions Remain in Wake of Cyclist’s Death

Questions Remain in Wake of Cyclist’s Death

Shortly before 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, August 11th, the victim was struck as he rode southbound in the crosswalk from North Boulder Drive. Witnesses at the scene state the driver of a Dodge pickup ran the red light striking the cyclist. Traffic from the neighborhoods along Boulder Drive and Lake Boulevard backed up as morning commuters sat in mute witness to another traffic fatality.

Bike lanes will no longer end on "the dreaded curve" on Churn Creek!

Bike lanes will no longer end on "the dreaded curve" on Churn Creek!

Following Old Alturas and Buenaventura, Churn Creek between Bodenhamer and Palacio along Boulder Creek Elementary is getting full 7' bike lanes and some buffering! This section of road been one of the places that cyclist dread and tried to avoid due to almost no shoulder or bike lane combined with the high speeds and curve on the road. In addition to bike lanes, there will also be a rumble strip placed in the center of the road due to head-on collisions that have happened in the past.

This project is a huge connection that will see a massive increase in cycling traffic since the alternatives, Hilltop and Shasta View are very inconvenient detours that most people simply will not ride their bikes. Now they can comfortably and safely connect to Churn Creek, Dana, Hilltop businesses as well as the Rivertrail and everywhere it connects to!

URGENT: Support Redding Active Transportation Projects

URGENT: Support Redding Active Transportation Projects

The City of Redding is applying for several million dollars for three (!) Active Transportation Program projects. The grant is VERY competitive, and every letter of support helps! If the City is selected for funding construction would likely be around 2020-2022 timeframe, and will spend the next several years refining the design to get to construction.

Grassroots Marketing: The Sea Otter Classic

Grassroots Marketing: The Sea Otter Classic

One of Ride Redding's main missions is to bring increased visibility to the Redding area and our amazing riding. For months we have been in discussions with Visit Redding about doing just that, and now it is becoming a reality. Visit Redding is supporting a Ride Redding contingent to the 2016 Sea Otter Classic to talk rider to rider and spread the word about our vast trail network, scenic country roads and upcoming events! We are stoked to represent! 

 

About The Sea Otter Classic

The event hosts over 10,000 athletes and 65,000 fans. Is universally regarded as the world’s premier cycling festival. Known as a sprawling and energetic “celebration of cycling”, Sea Otter is cycling’s North American season opener. Professional and amateur athletes alike make the annual pilgrimage to Sea Otter to participate in some of the sport’s most competitive and enduring events. Hundreds of pro cyclists, including national, world, and Olympic champions attend Sea Otter to race and meet with fans.

Most of cycling’s racing disciplines are represented including mountain bike cross country, downhill, dual slalom and short track racing. Road cyclists compete in circuit, criterium, and road racing. Also offered are cyclocross and a number of non-competitive recreational events for riders of all ages.

The Sea Otter Classic also hosts the largest consumer bike exposition in North America. The Expo holds hundreds of vendors who display new products, distribute free samples, and offer great bargains. The four-day, action-packed festival includes an international food court, entertainment, bike demos, stunt shows, and carnival activities for children.
— http://www.seaotterclassic.com/index.cfm/About_the_Sea_Otter_Classic.htm

Bobby McMullen & Ride Blind Racing Movie at Simpson University

Bobby McMullen & Ride Blind Racing Movie at Simpson University

On of our hometown heroes will be visiting to speak and show his movie "Ride Blind Racing Movie" That's right, Bobby is legally blind and shreds! I have known him for a lot of years, and he is one the nicest most humble guys as well as a blast to ride with and shoot. This is not an event to be missed.

Then join us for Simpson University's Red Hawk ride on Saturday!

URGENT! Support Oregon Gulch for Trails & Open Space!

URGENT! Support Oregon Gulch for Trails & Open Space!

385 acres of City owned property and possibly an additional 160 acres for a total of 560 acres could be preserved as a Natural Area with hiking and biking trails.  This would preserve a wildlife corridor and protect the habitat.  It could also lead to connectivity with other Redding trails.

 

Bikes for Kids 2015

Bikes for Kids 2015

Well, Ted did it again, 250+ bikes for Shasta County foster kids.  For eleven years now Ted Blankenheim has been doing this, spending the entire month of December haning out at Starbucks and reciving donated bikes and for that we thank him!

Ted with Madison Wade from KRCR TV, you can see her report  here

Ted with Madison Wade from KRCR TV, you can see her report here

The bike is such the perfect Christmas present because it can give the gift of not just fun and activity but the gift of freedom, allowing the kid to get around their neighborhood and burn some energy off!

Freedom! 

Freedom! 

Last year when Ride Redding started supporting Ted in this most impressive of endeavors we suggested that if kids are getting bikes, they should get helmets too! So this year the trifecta of Dignity Healthcare, Village Cycle, and Kali Protectives stepped up and helped make sure that these Shasta County foster kids not only had bikes but helmets! 

All the images from the day! 

Press Concierge: The Path Less Pedaled

Press Concierge: The Path Less Pedaled

One of Ride Redding's primary missions is to bring outside exposure to our area from contacts we have in the media industry, as well as create new partnerships. You could do all the expensive traditional advertising you want, but it is hard to put a price on authentic editorials like The Path Less Pedaled.

Russ and Laura are the passionate creators of the The Path Less Pedaled. They are on a self-described "open-ended bicycle tour" exploring the world by bike and documenting their travels in near real time via Youtube and social media. Not only do they love the bicycle touring lifestyle, but are also quite fond of fly-fishing; making Redding the perfect place for countless adventures exploring our vast network of paved and dirt trails by bike, while in the same day enjoying fly fishing on our sparkling lakes and rivers.

We hosted Russ and Laura in November and had a blast talking over some local brews about bikes, gear, favorite rides and sharing ideas on creating strong local economies based on recreational (including bicycle!) tourism. During their quick stay they did some fly fishing along the Sacramento River and rode part of the new Great Shasta Rail Trail. They were impressed with what Redding has to offer said they'll be coming back again soon! Ride Redding plans to team up with the The Path Less Pedaled duo and cook up some powerful media for our community! Stay tuned!

Make sure to give them a "like" here on Facebook and follow their explorations here on YouTube! They are super fun to watch! We are envious of their travels and adventures but can live vicariously through social media. :)

And of course, no trip to our area is complete without visiting the Great Shasta Rail Trail and a little gravel grinding! 

Climb Descend Repeat

Climb Descend Repeat

INCASE YOU MISSED OUR FILM NIGHT AT THE CASCADE HERE IS THE LOCAL FILM CLIMB DESCEND REPEAT. WE REALLY DO HAVE SOME AMAZING RIDING HERE! 

Redding Rolls Out the Green Lanes!

Redding Rolls Out the Green Lanes!

Intersections can the most dangerous place on the roads for people, whether you walk, bike or drive. 

Designs for intersections should minimize conflicts between people in vehicles and vulnerable road users, people walking and biking, by heightening the level of visibility, denoting a clear right-of-way, and facilitating eye contact and awareness with other road users.

Intersection treatments, such as using colored pavement markings, can help resolve both queuing and merging maneuvers for bicyclists, highlight proper lane positioning, increase motorist yielding behaviors, and is a more attractive facility for many people on bikes.


Colored pavement within a bicycle lane increases the visibility of the bike lane, identifies potential areas of conflict, and reinforces priority to bicyclists in conflict areas. Colored pavement can be utilized either as a corridor treatment along the length of a bike lane or as a spot treatment, including bike boxes, conflict areas, or for intersection crossing markings. 

Colored Bike Facility Benefits

  • Promotes the multi-modal nature of a street corridor.
  • Increases the visibility of bicyclists.
  • Discourages illegal parking in the bike lane.    
  • When used in conflict areas, raises motorist and bicyclist awareness to potential areas of conflict.    
  • Increases bicyclist comfort though clearly delineated space.    
  • Increases motorist yielding behavior.    
  • Helps reduce bicycle conflicts with turning motorists.    

Typical Applications

  • Within bike lanes.
  • Across turning conflict areas, such as, vehicle right turn lanes.
  • Across intersections, particularly through wide or complex intersections where the bicycle path may be unclear. 
  • Across driveways and stop or yield-controlled cross-streets.
  • Where typical vehicle movements frequently encroach into bicycle space, such as across ramp-style exits and entries.

The City of Redding is trying two different products of the green pavement markings to see which one better performs in our area.

The first are preformed thermoplastic pavement markings that contain uniformly distributed glass beads is designed to be used in heavy traffic locations. Anti slip and skid resistance is built in. 

The second is a liquid hot process that is applied in a similar way as thermoplastic striping like edge-lines and crosswalks by doing a controlled pour while in motion. It contains anti skid materials designed to provide continued anti slip and skid resistance as the material wears down. 



Preformed Thermoplastic Pavement Markings Process

The "green stuff" actually isn't paint at all, it is thermoplastic. It comes in sheets.

The "green stuff" actually isn't paint at all, it is thermoplastic. It comes in sheets.

Handle with care. The sheets are brittle and can break.

Handle with care. The sheets are brittle and can break.

After cleaning the surface of debris and moisture an adhesive is rolled down as a pre-treatment. 

After cleaning the surface of debris and moisture an adhesive is rolled down as a pre-treatment. 

it is a tedious process.

it is a tedious process.

Sheets must be cut carefully and placed, much like a jigsaw puzzle. 

Sheets must be cut carefully and placed, much like a jigsaw puzzle. 

The sheets get heated so they melt into the asphalt. 

The sheets get heated so they melt into the asphalt. 

Immediately after they are heated, an additional layer of tiny glass beads are thrown on for reflectivity. 

Immediately after they are heated, an additional layer of tiny glass beads are thrown on for reflectivity. 


Hot Applied Process

Guide lines applied.

Guide lines applied.

Taping off the edges for a clean finish.

Taping off the edges for a clean finish.

The hot thermoplastic pours from the hopper in the truck into the applicator machine.

The hot thermoplastic pours from the hopper in the truck into the applicator machine.

Rounded glass beads poured into the hopper.

Rounded glass beads poured into the hopper.

Checking consistency of the mixture.

Checking consistency of the mixture.

Getting it up to a temperature of 390-420F

Getting it up to a temperature of 390-420F

Applying.

Applying.

Removing the tape for a clean straight edge before it cools completely.

Removing the tape for a clean straight edge before it cools completely.

CycloFemme Mothers Day Ladies Ride

CycloFemme Mothers Day Ladies Ride

Once a year, riders around the world unite, taking part in a day called CycloFemme.

FROM THOSE LEARNING TO RIDE, TO PRO RACERS, AND EVERYONE IN BETWEEN, WE DISCOVER THE JOY AND EMPOWERMENT OF THE RIDE, TOGETHER.

CycloFemme is a Global Women’s Cycling Day created TO HONOR THE PAST and the emancipation of our grandmothers and great-grandmothers, for the freedom to choose and the chance to wear pants. TO CELEBRATE THE PRESENT and the riders who keep it rolling, bringing women’s racing to the forefront, pushing the limits, breaking down barriers and sharing the love of the bike with everyone along the way. TO EMPOWER THE FUTURE of women in cycling and the opportunity for positive social change.
— http://cyclofemme.com

5pm at the Sundial Bridge

Options up to 32miles CAR FREE with many turn back options.

Link to Facebook event

Link to STRAVA Route

Foothill Highschool Graduate Chris Jones to Compete in Paris-Roubaix this Sunday!

Foothill Highschool Graduate Chris Jones to Compete in Paris-Roubaix this Sunday!

Hell of the North

Paris–Roubaix is one of the oldest and most prestigious races of professional road cycling. It was first run in 1896 and has stopped only for two world wars. It's nickname l'enfer du Nord, or Hell of the North though aptly named is not because of the difficulty or danger of its cobble sections for which the race is famous for but because of WW1. 

"We enter into the centre of the battlefield. There's not a tree, everything is flattened! Not a square meter that has not been hurled upside down. There's one shell hole after another. The only things that stand out in this churned earth are the crosses with their ribbons in blue, white and red. It is hell!" -The real Hell of the North

Chris Jones

Seriously one of the nicest and toughest guys in the peloton got his cycling start here in Redding. I remember watching him do a max heart rate test on the trainer in the parking lot of Sue's Java, when his heart rate got up to around 220bpm the coach shut him down, I believe to say, 'you might want to get that looked at' or something to that effect. He quickly started dominating the group rides and learning from the more experienced local riders, always with a smile he worked hard and rose to become a pro. 

"Now in his fifth year with the UnitedHealthcare Pro Cycling Team, eight-year veteran Chris Jones returns to the Team following an impressive solid 2014 campaign. Jones was unquestionably a key member of last year’s squad, playing a major role not only supporting in his Teammates and delivering them to multiple top podium results, but also as an aggressive breakaway opportunist. Jones earned 4th place on Stage 5 of the 2014 Amgen Tour of California, as well as an impressive 4th in the 2014 US Professional Road Race, his second top-10 result in the race. In 2012, Jones finished 5th Overall in the Tour of Britain, scoring the Team’s best European GC result to date at that point. One of the toughest men in the sport, Jones experienced a severe crash during the 2012 Amgen Tour of California which required 20 plus stitches a lacerated knee, only to push through the balance of the Tour and shepherd his Teammates to success. The dependable, dynamic and selfless Northern California native continually delivers for his mates, whether it is in the mountains, the narrow roads in Italy or the cobblestones in Belgium. -United Health Care Cycling Team

If you want to follow Chris you can find him on STRAVA  or TWITTER If you want to watch him race live at Paris-Roubaix live this sunday cyclingfans.com has you covered!

 

“This wasn't a race. It was a pilgrimage.” 

— Henri Pélissier, speaking of his 1919 victory

WE DID IT! Boomtown BMX gets a new start ram!

WE DID IT! Boomtown BMX gets a new start ram!

CHECK US OUT ON SOCIAL MEDIA.

 


In less than 72 hrs the Ride Redding community came together to get Boomtown BMX the new start ram that they needed! Thank you everyone that donated, liked, shared as well as told their friends and family. You don't necessarily have to donate to help make a difference, you just have to help get the word out. If you like what Ride Redding is up to please become a free member

Take a moment and thank the people below!

$100 JEREMY PIKE

$40 The DoddSquad

$50 Doug Rodgers Worthy cause.

$20 Anonymous

$25 Kareem Speake

$25 John Donaldson Boomtown is a great place for kids. We appreciated how nicely Cameron was treated when he rode there for a few months. We hope when he gets a little older he will return to BMX'ing. Keep up the good work.

$100 Marty Boster

$25 Jann Scott My son, Steve, spent lots of time BMXing on a track he built in our backyard. Great sport!

$20 Ken Denser Flipping the gate is not fun

$5 Michelle Leake

$20 Bike Distro 

$20 Anonymous

$50 Anonymous 

$20 Billy Back 

$20 Sean Kearns It's not much but I hope it helps

$88 Anonymous

The Pain Train

The Pain Train

On Sunday some riders did 65 miles and 14,500' around Whiskeytown Lake as part of the Pain Train Endurance Race. I road my moto around to get some shots, the day was epic and warm to say the least, I only shot until around 2pm because of the 3hrs of sleep that I got the night before, maybe next year I will be able to get up Shasta Bally for some more epic scenic shots.

Grassroots events like this is how Mountain Bike Racing got started, part of this course even touch on one of the first organized Mountain Bike events, The Whiskeytown Downhill. 

 

Images available here. 

If We Want the Masses to Ride We Must Provide Physically Protected Urban Trails

If We Want the Masses to Ride We Must Provide Physically Protected Urban Trails

Most of us in the community have been to and used, or at least know of the Sacramento River Trail.  It connects the Downtown Mall, Bechelli, Sundial Bridge, Turtle Bay, Hilltop Bluffs, Cadwell Park, Old Shasta, Keswick, Stanford Hills and Lake Redding Estates together without needing to come into contact with vehicles. This trail is great for recreation and helps some people commute from one part of town to another. But we can do better. There is a lot of chatter about adding bike lanes and buffers for commuting in the down town area. Thus increasing business and even helping to revilitize downtown. This is all well and good, but you will only get a certain type of cyclist to use these facilities. There are different types of cyclists and they are willing to use different kinds of facilities if provided.

  • Strong and Fearless - Rides anywhere, just because they feel comfortable on the open road doesn't mean they wouldn't mind having the best kind of facilities. Very few people are this way. 
  • Enthused and Confident - Uses bike lanes and bigger shouldered roads, changes route to avoid conflicts, really likes places like the River Trail. This is a slightly larger group than Strong and Fearless.
  • Interested but Concerned - Your classic, puts the bike on the back of the car to get to the River Trail because they just don't feel safe sharing the road. This is often the majority of people in a community.
  • The last group is, "no way, no how will I ride a bike!"

If we connect major shopping & dining areas with neighborhoods, schools, churches and community centers. Use physically protected urban trails that connect to the existing River Trail, we can really start to help revitilize this community with the bike and all the benefits that go along with it for transportation, lifestyle and recreation.

Now we have academic proof of this, Portland State University's National Institute of Transportation and Communities released it's study of separated on street facilities. People for Bikes has a shorter break down of this study. Below is their info graphic breaking down the increase in usage. I think we can do better.

Most of these are just separated by reflective plastic flex post or parking spaces.  In an age of distracted driving and ever increasing anger towards cyclist. When and where we can, we should physically protect cyclist with something like short sections of planters with trees or shrubs.  Or circumvent the streets all together with paths like the River Trail. This is not to say that in certain situations a conventional bike lane or shoulder widening should not be done. Think of the Urban Trail as an extension of the River Trail.  Mimicking the main arteries of the town. We also have a lot of opportunity with the creeks & greenbelts throughout our city.  Think, Churn Creek Trail, dirt on one side paved on the other.

We must also do this intelligently as to not over promise and under deliver results. By simply extending the River Trail into parts of town with a physically protected Urban Trail we have a user base that will use the new sections that are constructed. If we were just to construct an urban trail along California Street without connecting it to the River Trail how would people safely get there to use it? It would effectively connect to nothing. An empty path could lead to backlash against the project and future projects.

If you wish to voice your opinion on California Street, (here is mine)  come to Caltrans open house on thursday

So whats REALLY up with California Street

So whats REALLY up with California Street

If you have been following the Redding news in the last week about California Street you may have the impression that in order to have a bike lane you must take away a lane for cars, this is simply not true. The Record Searchlight Article & KRCR News do not make it clear exactly what is going on, it seems that the choice is either take away a lane to get a bike lane or nothing depending on which source you read. It is hard to tell that you can have 3 travel lanes for vehicles and a bike lane which was the original plan by Caltrans for months.

On Friday, May 16th I went on a ride with the Director of CalTrans District 2, John Bulinski, the City of Redding's Public Works Director, Brian Crane, and a group of interested cyclists. The ride was organized by Caltrans and promoted through Healthy Shasta's calendar of Bike Month events to allow for the community to engage with transportation officials about the upcoming possible addition of a bike lane to sections of California and Pine streets (State Highway 273) through downtown that are slated for a pavement maintenance project this summer.

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An Open Letter to Caltrans & The City of Redding Regarding California Street - You Can Keep 3 Lanes and add a Bike Lane

An Open Letter to Caltrans & The City of Redding Regarding California Street - You Can Keep 3 Lanes and add a Bike Lane

There has been a lot of buzz around California Street over the past few days. I have a few thoughts I would like to share. I would like you to hear my perspective, even if you don’t agree with me, I want to hear yours. Then I would like to work with you to create our vision, not just for California Street but for creating a cycling effect here that truly makes Redding a more bicycle friendly place to live, work, play and visit.

Please read below my open letter to Caltrans & The City of Redding regarding California Street.

To Caltrans District 2 & The City of Redding

 

It appears from the news that Caltrans is considering taking California Street to two lanes to add a bike lane. This is contrary to what I heard on the May 16th Caltrans bicycle ride that lane removal was not being considered.

I never thought I would be advocating against what might be considered a good bicycle improvement at first glance. I am a driver of a large vehicle, also a motorcyclist not just a bicyclist.

I have experienced more aggressive acts than I can count directed at me by angry drivers in my 20+ years of cycling experience when riding exactly how and where I am supposed to be according to the facility provided to me. If they take time to exchange words their message is clear: they feel I should not be on the road. So I prefer to not be on the road if it appears that I (as a cyclist) am taking it away from them.  These incidents include but are not limited to; baseball bats, baby seats, full cups of tobacco chew, urine multiple attempts to run me over from a single driver, and guns brandished, yes plural guns. The incidents have happened while riding with groups, by myself and even directed at cyclist that are clearly women I am riding with. Cops mostly either don’t care, can not enforce the law due to evidence requirements or are to busy.

I prefer to do nothing rather than the wrong thing on California Street. I fear the headline: “Driver Angry About Lane Removal Kills Cyclist.”

I will only support lane or parking removal on California Street if a protected facility is being put in its place.

I think the right thing for now, is to put in a bike lane on California Street with out removing a lane. By not removing a lane at this time this project (and future projects) avoid backlash and anger directed at unprotected humans riding bicycles on the road.

In either scenario, 3 lanes or 2 lanes you can still have a bike lane. This way I have a place to ride while not “taking” anything away from motorists.

I would ultimately like to support the removal of a lane to install a protected facility that connects the River Trail to downtown. A fully protected “Urban Trail” would be the safest investment and be the most appealing facility to help create a vibrant revitalized downtown.

Respectfully, Carson Blume

Want to know more? Read the next post: So whats REALLY up with California Street