Bikes for Kids 2015

Bikes for Kids 2015

Well, Ted did it again, 250+ bikes for Shasta County foster kids.  For eleven years now Ted Blankenheim has been doing this, spending the entire month of December haning out at Starbucks and reciving donated bikes and for that we thank him!

 Ted with Madison Wade from KRCR TV, you can see her report  here

Ted with Madison Wade from KRCR TV, you can see her report here

The bike is such the perfect Christmas present because it can give the gift of not just fun and activity but the gift of freedom, allowing the kid to get around their neighborhood and burn some energy off!

 Freedom! 

Freedom! 

Last year when Ride Redding started supporting Ted in this most impressive of endeavors we suggested that if kids are getting bikes, they should get helmets too! So this year the trifecta of Dignity Healthcare, Village Cycle, and Kali Protectives stepped up and helped make sure that these Shasta County foster kids not only had bikes but helmets! 

All the images from the day! 

Press Concierge: The Path Less Pedaled

Press Concierge: The Path Less Pedaled

One of Ride Redding's primary missions is to bring outside exposure to our area from contacts we have in the media industry, as well as create new partnerships. You could do all the expensive traditional advertising you want, but it is hard to put a price on authentic editorials like The Path Less Pedaled.

Russ and Laura are the passionate creators of the The Path Less Pedaled. They are on a self-described "open-ended bicycle tour" exploring the world by bike and documenting their travels in near real time via Youtube and social media. Not only do they love the bicycle touring lifestyle, but are also quite fond of fly-fishing; making Redding the perfect place for countless adventures exploring our vast network of paved and dirt trails by bike, while in the same day enjoying fly fishing on our sparkling lakes and rivers.

We hosted Russ and Laura in November and had a blast talking over some local brews about bikes, gear, favorite rides and sharing ideas on creating strong local economies based on recreational (including bicycle!) tourism. During their quick stay they did some fly fishing along the Sacramento River and rode part of the new Great Shasta Rail Trail. They were impressed with what Redding has to offer said they'll be coming back again soon! Ride Redding plans to team up with the The Path Less Pedaled duo and cook up some powerful media for our community! Stay tuned!

Make sure to give them a "like" here on Facebook and follow their explorations here on YouTube! They are super fun to watch! We are envious of their travels and adventures but can live vicariously through social media. :)

And of course, no trip to our area is complete without visiting the Great Shasta Rail Trail and a little gravel grinding! 

The first version of the Ride Redding app is here!

The first version of the Ride Redding app is here!

A pretty simple app for our first go-around, the best feature, being able to put in a street sweeping request to the City of Redding! Only within the city limits and please to not abuse this, use it only for it's intended purpose and selectively. Thank you.

For iOS/Apple

Google Play/Android

2015 Redding Lighted Christmas Parade!

2015 Redding Lighted Christmas Parade!

Ride Redding will be participating in the 2015 Redding Lighted Christmas Parade!

Date: Saturday, Dec 5th, 2015

Parade Start: 6 PM (rain or shine)

Location: Downtown Redding

EVERYONE in the parade MUST HAVE LIGHTS
per the parade rules and regulations.
Arrive early! The Parade rolls out at 6 PM.

Ride Redding will be riding in a warm glow of white and orange!

Options:
1. Light up your own bike in your own style of glow!
2. Fly the Ride Redding colors in orange and white glow!

Don't have any LED battery powered lights for you ride?
Check out the abundance of the interwebs!    http://tinyurl.com/qyrk4xb
Even SOLAR POWERED!    http://tinyurl.com/ngcjmwt

To shop in stores check out places around town like Ace Hardware.

Bring your lighted bike and ride in your best holiday flair! Let's ride!

 

 

Ride to Remember Paul Graham

Ride to Remember Paul Graham

Friends & Family of Paul Graham and Ride Redding are hosting a memorial ride Sunday, November 8th at 12:00 pm. The ride is in honor of local cyclist and resident Paul Graham who was killed while cycling in Redding. Interested participants are encouraged to learn more at Ride Redding’s Facebook page. Riders are encouraged to arrive at 12 pm at the Sundial Bridge parking lot. The ride route will follow the Sacramento River Trail loop and return to the Sundial Bridge. 

 

image.jpg

Climb Descend Repeat

Climb Descend Repeat

INCASE YOU MISSED OUR FILM NIGHT AT THE CASCADE HERE IS THE LOCAL FILM CLIMB DESCEND REPEAT. WE REALLY DO HAVE SOME AMAZING RIDING HERE! 

Redding Rolls Out the Green Lanes!

Redding Rolls Out the Green Lanes!

Intersections can the most dangerous place on the roads for people, whether you walk, bike or drive. 

Designs for intersections should minimize conflicts between people in vehicles and vulnerable road users, people walking and biking, by heightening the level of visibility, denoting a clear right-of-way, and facilitating eye contact and awareness with other road users.

Intersection treatments, such as using colored pavement markings, can help resolve both queuing and merging maneuvers for bicyclists, highlight proper lane positioning, increase motorist yielding behaviors, and is a more attractive facility for many people on bikes.


Colored pavement within a bicycle lane increases the visibility of the bike lane, identifies potential areas of conflict, and reinforces priority to bicyclists in conflict areas. Colored pavement can be utilized either as a corridor treatment along the length of a bike lane or as a spot treatment, including bike boxes, conflict areas, or for intersection crossing markings. 

Colored Bike Facility Benefits

  • Promotes the multi-modal nature of a street corridor.
  • Increases the visibility of bicyclists.
  • Discourages illegal parking in the bike lane.    
  • When used in conflict areas, raises motorist and bicyclist awareness to potential areas of conflict.    
  • Increases bicyclist comfort though clearly delineated space.    
  • Increases motorist yielding behavior.    
  • Helps reduce bicycle conflicts with turning motorists.    

Typical Applications

  • Within bike lanes.
  • Across turning conflict areas, such as, vehicle right turn lanes.
  • Across intersections, particularly through wide or complex intersections where the bicycle path may be unclear. 
  • Across driveways and stop or yield-controlled cross-streets.
  • Where typical vehicle movements frequently encroach into bicycle space, such as across ramp-style exits and entries.

The City of Redding is trying two different products of the green pavement markings to see which one better performs in our area.

The first are preformed thermoplastic pavement markings that contain uniformly distributed glass beads is designed to be used in heavy traffic locations. Anti slip and skid resistance is built in. 

The second is a liquid hot process that is applied in a similar way as thermoplastic striping like edge-lines and crosswalks by doing a controlled pour while in motion. It contains anti skid materials designed to provide continued anti slip and skid resistance as the material wears down. 



Preformed Thermoplastic Pavement Markings Process

 The "green stuff" actually isn't paint at all, it is thermoplastic. It comes in sheets.

The "green stuff" actually isn't paint at all, it is thermoplastic. It comes in sheets.

 Handle with care. The sheets are brittle and can break.

Handle with care. The sheets are brittle and can break.

 After cleaning the surface of debris and moisture an adhesive is rolled down as a pre-treatment. 

After cleaning the surface of debris and moisture an adhesive is rolled down as a pre-treatment. 

 it is a tedious process.

it is a tedious process.

 Sheets must be cut carefully and placed, much like a jigsaw puzzle. 

Sheets must be cut carefully and placed, much like a jigsaw puzzle. 

 The sheets get heated so they melt into the asphalt. 

The sheets get heated so they melt into the asphalt. 

 Immediately after they are heated, an additional layer of tiny glass beads are thrown on for reflectivity. 

Immediately after they are heated, an additional layer of tiny glass beads are thrown on for reflectivity. 


Hot Applied Process

 Guide lines applied.

Guide lines applied.

 Taping off the edges for a clean finish.

Taping off the edges for a clean finish.

 The hot thermoplastic pours from the hopper in the truck into the applicator machine.

The hot thermoplastic pours from the hopper in the truck into the applicator machine.

 Rounded glass beads poured into the hopper.

Rounded glass beads poured into the hopper.

 Checking consistency of the mixture.

Checking consistency of the mixture.

 Getting it up to a temperature of 390-420F

Getting it up to a temperature of 390-420F

 Applying.

Applying.

 Removing the tape for a clean straight edge before it cools completely.

Removing the tape for a clean straight edge before it cools completely.

Ride Redding MTB Film Festival Featuring UnReal

Ride Redding MTB Film Festival Featuring UnReal

Three films; Climb Descend Repeat a local film by a local film maker, Revel in the Chaos, and our feature film unReal! Short presentation from Ride Redding and raffle with $1500 in prizes! Come support Ride Redding and find up what we are up to for 2016! Only $10 and kids under 16 are free! 

Special thanks to our sponsors for this event: Catalyst, Chain Gang, Sports LTD, Village Cycle, The Bike Shop, Cyclopedia, Burrito Bandito and Dutch Brothers!

Diestelhorst to Downtown Part II - A California Street Street Solution

Diestelhorst to Downtown Part II - A California Street Street Solution

So now that it looks like the City will have the funding to connect the River Trail to California Street with an urban trail and the Downtown Transportation Plan is winding up, its now a good time to think about completing the connection to Downtown and river trail access and what that might look like? Where the Diestelhorst to Downtown project ends at California Street, it is a quite block an easy to cross block that would be a perfect place to put some rapid flashing beacons and have the Urban Trail cross California Street and continue all the way down the left side (eastside) of California, physical protected from the cars, making it truly a facility that an 12 year old would feel comfortable riding on.

If you can get to the River Trail you should be able to get downtown. 

4-Protected-UrbanTrail-2-Car-Lanes-Parking-Buffer.gif

Panorama Pump Park - A Next Generation Playground

Panorama Pump Park - A Next Generation Playground

We will be having a meeting with the community and the city at Rocky Point Charter School Friday August 13th at 5:30pm and it would be great if you could show up and wear a pump parks please button (free at the door) to show support and learn about the project, hopefully the first of many in our area! 

Downtown Redding Transportation Plan - Community Workshop #2

Downtown Redding Transportation Plan - Community Workshop #2

Check us out on Social Media 


Community Workshop #2 will be held on Thursday, September 24, in the Atrium at the south end of the Market Street Promenade (same location as the first workshop), from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.   The purpose of the workshop is for the consultant team to present recommendations based on the feedback from the first workshop and for the community to help us formulate a final recommended plan for consideration by the City of Redding.  There will be a brief PowerPoint presentation followed by break-out sessions for you to provide more direct input in the four key focus areas of bicycle & pedestrian connections, traffic circulation, Market Street Promenade streets, and parking. For more info go to www.downtownreddingtransportationplan.com

Bike Lanes! Buenaventura from Placer to 299

Bike Lanes! Buenaventura from Placer to 299

I don't know about you but the thing I hate the most about bike lanes is that they disappear are inconsistent and often just end leaving you a bunch of non ideal options. Buenaventura is one of the worst, heading up you start off in a comfortable bike lane but at the top of the climb you lose it at the worst possible place, right next to a turn lane, it's ugly and the downhill isn't much better.

Luckily thats all getting changed, full and complete bike lanes the whole way!

See more below from the City of Redding.

....The project spans from Placer to Lakeside and will include a completion of the sidewalk on the east side of the road, improvements to the lane configuration for safety as well as bike lanes in both directions, where feasible painted buffers will be created between the bike lane and vehicular travel lane.

Please plan your trips accordingly.

Project is anticipated to be complete by the end of September.

Construction of a sidewalk on the east side of Buenaventura Blvd from Rosita Drive to Cal Ore Drive. In addition to new sidewalk the storm drain system will be upgraded, street lights will be installed and Buenaventura Blvd. from Placer treet to Lakeside Drive will be resurfaced and restriped.

Project construction will start on July 13, 2015, and is expected to be completed by September 22,2015. The work will take place during the day between the hours of 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. During the work hours Buenaventura Blvd. between Placer Street and Lakeside Drive will be subject to lane or shoulder closures with traffic control. The City of Redding wishes to advise all motorists to drive with caution when approaching this area or avoid them if possible...
— -City of Redding

Next project; Old Alturas from the Churn Creek Bridge to Shasta View!

Cyclists, we are the cars of the River Trail

Cyclists, we are the cars of the River Trail

CHECK US OUT ON SOCIAL MEDIA!

 

People on bikes often take a lot of bullying by people operating vehicles on the road but that doesn't mean we have to bully buzz or be inpatient on the trail. I have witnessed it myself recently, while talking to bike patrol officers from RPD. I was in the process of taking their picture and a woman on a road bike (you can see her in the pic below just over the shoulder of the officer on the right) came flying down the trail and with a super annoyed look on her face. The officers were in the process of moving out of the way when she squeezed herself between the two officers as she sped down the trail. 

This is just one example. Do not be that person, when you ride like that woman, you are no better than the people who buzz, assault or bully you with their cars & trucks on the road. 

Just talked to these to gentleman about a #rideredding #citizensbikepatrol next step talk to the chief #redding #thisistedding

A photo posted by Carson Blume Photography (@carsonblume) on

Now don't get me wrong cyclists have to deal with a lot of issues on the trail as well. On the bike you have to watch out for people with their dog leashes stretched across the trail, people walking 4-5 wide blocking the whole trail completely oblivious that there are other trail users, but just remember that on the road the roles are reversed. Those people walking that you buzz my just might return the favor with a 2000lb+ battering ram. There are consequences to our actions.

 

make your presence known & adjust your riding style

It seems pretty simple, when you come up behind someone and get within earshot you are should use bike bell or say "on your left" if people are walking to the right. Which hopefully they are, but if not, do not get all bent out of shape about it. Just deal with it, and move on. You need to let people know you are passing and not startle them. 

The issues with saying on left are out there everyday, people wearing earbuds not hearing you, jumpy people (tweakers) that freak out when you say on your left, I have even had someone step in front of me thinking I said "move to your left." This is why we must use caution and adjust our speed to the conditions in front of us.

the speed limit

There has always been a speed limit on the river trail as far as I can remember. Back when I ran high school cross country practice we joked about how we were breaking the speed limit while running. There lies the problem, with having an unwarranted low speed limit, no one is going to respect it. It is like an unwarranted stop sign, if a stop sign is put in at a intersection where it does not meet the criteria for one, people are just going to blow by it and eventually most people will ignore it and sometimes people get hurt. Same thing may happen with an absurdly low bike speed limit.

The problem with ignoring a posted speed limit on the river trail is that the people who think 10mph is a valid speed limit are going to observe a ton of cyclists (and some runners, not that this is what this is about) blatantly breaking the law. Thus, contributing to the perception that cyclists are scofflaws that don't pay taxes and creates generally negative thoughts about people on bicycles that can manifest itself in many ways on and off the road/trail. 

Speed limits are traditionally set at the 85th percentile of speeds on that segment of the road and that speed is deemed a reasonable and safe speed to travel when conditions are good (clear, sunny, dry). In order to set a speed limit on a road you have to do a survey to record the speeds and do the math. Revisiting the speed limit brings forward a few questions, is it just the speed of the bikes? the bikes and runners? or all trail users? 

Doing a little quick math and using some STRAVA data I came up with about 19mph for cyclists on the south side of the river trail (there were also 36 runners that technically were breaking the speed limit). Now, if we are to include all trail users including walkers strollers ect it will admittedly dragging the number way down. My answer to that, is if they have to include all trail users then we should have to include all road users including cyclist and runners when setting speeds on the road effectively reducing speeds on the road where cyclist and pedestrians are present. Or you can do the whole statistics thing and remove some of the slowest and some of the fastest numbers. 

We need intelligent & practical solutions

A blanket !0 MPH on the river trail is not good for anyone. People on bikes can't get to where they want to go quickly (commuters), get fit (recreational and competitive riders). People on bikes will just ignore it (thats reality) thus people on foot will think they are law breakers even if they pass them with courtesy and respect. It could also hurt bicycle tourism, no visiting cyclist would want to return if they got a ticket and when they don't come back and they will tell all their friends to not ride or visit Redding, that's bad for business. I have seen little old ladies on beach cruisers with puppies in their basket riding faster than 10 MPH, which is awesome.

One idea- instead of a blanket 10 MPH, let's recognize that speed limits are necessary in a few congested places maybe a few speed limit zones are in order with a sign that says something like 'congested area, use caution, 12mph or 15mph' depending on the zone. Perhaps other signs that promote tips for respectful sharing both for people walking and biking.

What are your ideas? 

Don't be that cyclist.

Whatever happens, let this be a lesson to us, that what we do as on a bike wherever we ride, has an effect of the image of cyclists everywhere. How one of us acts and behaves on a bike, reflects on us all. The reason that the 10mph speed limit stencil appeared on the river trail is that a lot of trail users have been complaining about cyclists to the City, and this is the result.

Remember, just like we want cars to share the road with us, we must share the trail. The trail is meant for people, not just people on bicycles.

Be this cyclist.

If you want to take being a "good cyclist" a step further, smile and or wave, at the very least acknowledge all other trail users. If you really want to knock it out of the park do the same on the road. 

Let the future know how much Whiskeytown means to us!

Let the future know how much Whiskeytown means to us!

The National Park Service is now accepting letters describing people’s impressions and stories of Whiskeytown National Recreation Area in celebrating the park’s 50th Anniversary as a national park site. All letters will be placed inside the Children’s Time Capsule and sealed for the next 50 years until 2065.

Support the Rivertrail Experience from Diestelhorst to Downtown

Support the Rivertrail Experience from Diestelhorst to Downtown

SOCIALIZE WITH US! 


This is about the freedom to choose how to move safely through our community. Diestelhorst to Downtown is about connecting the miles of River Trail and our neighborhoods along it with downtown. If you have ever tried to get downtown walking or biking you know what I am talking about. This project will bring the River Trail experience all the way to California street.